The Neglected

Composer

A Classical Music Blog about music both ~ NEW & OLD ~

Thursday, May 25, 2017

The Italian Trecento is an often overlooked period in Western Music history, marked as the transition between the artistic pinnacle of Medieval music with Guillaume de Machaut and the genesis of Renaissance music with the Burgundian School's adoption of the contenance angloise in the early 15th century. The Trecento, however, persists as a period essential to the cultural and social changes that Europe underwent during the early modern era. Not merely transitory, the Trecento, with its societal tribulations during the Black Death and Papal Schism, fostered a climate of pseudo-secularism that w...

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Thirty miles west of the bustling Spanish metropolis, Barcelona, nestled in the craggy serrations of the multi-peaked mountain range Montserrat is Catalonia’s most important religious pilgrimage site since the Middle Ages, the Benedictine abbey of Santa Maria de Montserrat (“St. Mary of the Serrated Mountain”). Starting in the 11th century and continuing through the late Middle Ages, Montserrat became a significant pilgrimage site for devotion to the Virgin Mary. Intriguingly, music has consistently maintained a central role in these pilgrimage activities beginning with the founding in the 12t...

Saturday, September 24, 2016

After having spent time on music from late medieval France, I think it fair I give attention to the other contemporary musical movements happening in Europe. Over a series of three blogs, I hope to give some analytical attention to music from Italian composers and sources from the Trecento (literally meaning “14th century,” but referring to the Italian parallel to the French Ars Nova movement) and the Ars Subtilior (“subtle art,” which was an esoteric music trend in both France and Italy during this time).

This week, I would like to focus on Johannes Ciconia, perhaps one of the most prominent c...

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Today, Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300 - 1377) is considered the most prominent composer and poet of the 14th century, bridging the musical styles of the ars antiqua and ars nova and influencing proceeding poets like Geoffrey Chaucer. He benefits greatly in modern scholarship by being one of the few composers of medieval music for whom biographical information is available. Furthermore, his own ego has served his continued fame well, for throughout his life he oversaw numerous compilations of his entire oeuvre, a practice very uncommon before the 15th century. These compilations have lasted the...

Friday, August 5, 2016

The Ivrea Codex and the Papal Court at Avignon

The Ivrea Codex (c. 1360) stands with the Roman de Fauvel as one of the most important anthological repositories of 14th century polyphony, containing more than 80 pieces. The codex was probably written for the papal court in Avignon, France during what has been called the “Babylonian Captivity” of the Papacy from 1309 to 1377, during which time seven successive popes resided in France rather than in Rome. This move arose due to a conflict between King Philip IV of France and the Papacy under Pope Boniface VIII and his successor Benedict XI. Follow...

Sunday, July 31, 2016

"Early music" is a field of listening that many do not follow, even the most avid of classical music lovers. There are many opinions as to what time this label actually encompasses, but I propose it begins as far back as notated music in the West and ends before Palestrina (c. 1525 – 2 February 1594). Many would disagree, saying that early music ends around 1600 with the invention of opera by Jacopo Peri and Claudio Monteverdi, but Palestrina and the late 16th century has entered into so much of mainstream "classical" listening, that this music has lost most of its "early" edge for my taste. T...

Friday, March 18, 2016

Schroeder on Liturgical Music in the 20th Century

The accessibility of Schroder’s choral music is probably in part due to Schroeder’s concern with liturgical music reform. Like Palestrina centuries before, Schroeder was looking for a repertoire of quality music that would serve the function of Christian worship without undue excess. Schroeder expresses what he believes to be the measure by which one assess ecclesiastical music in his essay, Zur Katholischen Musik Der Gegenwart:

So haben wir zwei Maßstäbe, nach denen liturgische Musik zu verwerten ist: nach ihrer liturgischen Eignung und nach ihr...

Saturday, March 12, 2016

Biography: Mid-Life

Hermann Schroeder’s first professional post of distinction was as teacher of theory at the Rheinische Musikschule in Cologne between 1930 and 1938. (Mohr n.pag.). It was during this time that Schroeder founded his own chamber orchestra in Cologne and directed the church choir of St. Joseph in Duisburg, with whom he could test his first choral compositions, including Te Deum, Op. 16 for mixed choir and brass. Following these appointments, Schroeder became the cathedral organist at St. Paulin in Trier between 1938 and 1945 where he composed his Pauliner Orgelmesse (P...